Skip to main content

Inorganic Chemistry

Professor Wilker and his research.

Inorganic chemistry, by definition, encompasses the entire periodic table. Thus, the field is extremely diverse. From solid-state materials to the inorganic biochemistry of life to nanotechnology, the research interests of the Purdue inorganic faculty promise exciting choices for the graduate student. Organometallic chemistry is represented by research in catalysis, metal clusters, metal-metal multiply bonded species, and semiconductor surface chemistry. Examples of ongoing materials research include conducting polymer and self-assembled monolayer design. Bioinorganic chemistry encompasses research into metal-protein and metal-DNA interactions, biological inorganic materials, electron transfer, and pharmaceutical design. Research into photochemistry involves the tuning and modulation of the light emitting properties of metal-based molecules. Work to determine the reactivity of main group species in water, particularly halogen-containing molecules, is being pursued because of its extreme importance to water purification.

Our Faculty

Suzanne Bart

Suzanne Bart

  • Coordination Chemistry
  • Actinides
  • Electronic Structure
  • Organometallic Chemistry
Christina Li

Christina Li

  • Nanomaterials
  • Catalysis
  • Renewable Energy and Fuels
Tong Ren

Tong Ren

  • Sustainability
  • 3D-metals
  • Conjugated
  • Photo-activity
Shiliang Tian

Shiliang Tian

  • Metalloprotein
  • Iron/Copper Homeostasis
  • Biocatalysis
  • Spectroscopy
Christopher Uyeda

Christopher Uyeda

  • Organometallic Chemistry
  • Catalysis
  • Metal–Metal Bonds
  • Earth Abundant Elements
Jonathan Wilker

Jonathan Wilker

  • Biomimicry
  • Adhesives
  • Polymers
  • Sustainability

More Information